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capitol hill. then eric cantor response of the lighthouse deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end of the bush tax cuts on those earning more than two and a $50,000. ed -- more than $250,000. ["hail to the chief" plays] please have a seat. have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello. it is good to be back in pennsylvania. it is good to be right here. i want to thank michael, robert, and the investor, joel glickman for hosting me today and giving me a great tour. stand up so everybody can see you, guys. [cheers and applause] there you go. we have a couple of outstanding members of congress here. [cheers and applause] now, i just finished getting a tour of the workshop. i have to say it makes me wish that joel invented this stuff sooner when i was a kid. back then, you couldn't build a roller coaster out of your erector set. i got a chance to meet some of the folks who have been working around the clock to keep up with the chr
to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan relies on $1.2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6 trillion in revenue from tax increases on the wealthy and $600 billion in spending cuts mostly from reductions in medicare. he also wants authority to raise the debt ceiling without congressional intervention. but governors emerged afterwards treading a line between the two sides. delaware governor jack markel, a democ
ceiling is clear. >> this isn't about getting a handle on the deficits or debt for him. it's about spending even more than he already has. >> white house aides reject republican claims that holding the debt limit over the president head is the only mechanism to get him to trim spending. >> you are going to keep the debt limit goes higher and you're spending money. you and congress. >> president signed in law, $1 trillion in spending cuts. there is a specific proposal to achieve $600 billion in savings from our entitlement programs. including our healthcare entitlement program. jay carney went so far to compare republican pressure on debt creeling to hostage taking. >> this is a profoundly bad idea that i think could not be more frightening for american businesses. and american workers. >> of course, treasury secretary geithner it go may have also frightened people yesterday. by telling cnbc the white house is prepared to go off the fiscal cliff, unless the republicans bend on taxes. comment by former democratic presidential candidate howard dean frightened republics that this debat
cannot just do deficit spending. so they agree, they cut this deal, now the democrats are going to the republicans and saying, forget that. let's just in the position to get rid of it. what on earth would make them think that republicans would agree to that? >> because the president thinks he has a mandate from the whole country. he thinks he can get anything he wants. i am sure that alan colmes loves this idea. here are the problems. the congress has the authority to authorize the debt. they also have the authority to authorize the bill that pays the debt. so now the president wants to take that away. this guy has shown a tendency to say that i don't need congress. i can pass laws with a stroke of a pen on executive orders. he doesn't need the supreme court because he declares laws unconstitutional, like doma. he says he wants an unlimited credit card, and you all will have to pay the bill. we have a debt ceiling, as much as people anguish over it, we need to have a conversation about what we are spending and why. will this be a problem if the president followed through on his
and its deficit. that's what we need. to try to slam the brakes right now and get to balance tomorrow is not desirable. economists will come on your show and tell you that that would not be good for the economy. so i think we're dealing with a degree of artificiality right there. >> congressman keith ellison, thanks for joining us. >> any time. thank you. >>> for more on this, let's bring in our cnn political contributor and republican strategist, mary matalin and cornel belcher, democratic strategist and pollster with the obama 2012 campaign. mary, what do you make of the details of this opening bid from the white house? republicans have already dismissed it but does it give us any clues at all about what an eventual deal might look like? >> it's reported that mitch mcconnell, senate minority leader, burst out laughing when he heard it. it's not even worthy of a laugh. it's really sad, it's pathetic. we went from a reasonable theoretical $3 in cuts for $1 in revenue which was basically the simpson-bowles, and are now at $4 of real and immediate tax increases plus new spending for in
house deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka
? >> reporter: scott, this republican counterproposal today is long on reducing the deficit and saving big on medicare, but it leaves the two sides still hundreds of billions of dollars apart and they are not close on the basic approach to solve the fiscal cliff. in a letter to the president, house republicans called their offer a fair middle ground. it's a ten-year framework that cuts the deficit by $2.2 trillion. it includes $600 billion in health care cuts-- mostly medicare and medicaid-- $300 billion in other mandatory spending and $300 billion in cuts to all other federal spending. by contrast, the president has proposed around $600 billion in cuts to all entitlements, including medicare and he'd reduce other federal spending by $100 billion a year. the president has also proposed spending $50 billion in new stimulus and republicans have refused to consider it. the biggest difference by far is in how to raise new revenues. republicans would raise $800 billion by reducing tax loopholes, not with a tax rate increase. the president would double new revenues to $1.6 trillion, with most of
to reduce the deficit. jenna: interesting the president is saying he was speaking off the you have cuff, no teleprompter there. he's speaking about how he's rooting on american business. pointed to a couple of aspects much the economy, improvement in consumer confidence and housing as well. he was going to talk a little bit about the fiscal cliff and that's something we've all been talking about recently, and what it means for us right now and the year ahead. we also have other business news. we'll get back to the president by the way if and when we get that feedback. he will be taking questions from the audience there of business leaders as gregg mentioned. elizabeth mcdonald ever the fox business network is standing by list toning some of what the president had to say about the economy. liz, can you place it in context about where our economy is right now. >> reporter: the president just now was placing it in the -- the economy in the broader context of what is going on in the world, mentioning asia, mentioning europe, and then he turned to what was the most important part of the spee
to work, a lot of the deficit goes away. >> didn't they say that last time? >> i didn't vote for that and the word stimulus is totally discredited. it did not -- 7% of that bill was investment and infrastructure. 42% was tax cuts. we've been trying tax cuts for more than a decade. they don't put people back to work. real investment does. we have report after report, economist after economist, real investment will put millions of people back to work. >> right. those were tax cuts of the vast middle in this country. what you want to extend and the republicans. i'm still confused. if the president wants $1.6 trillion in revenue and is going to do his math, that's $3 trillion in cuts. why only put 400 billion out? >> well, he's probably leaving himself a little room to negotiate. >> a little. >> is reasonable on medicare. if he just started negotiating lower drug prices, that saves medicare $230 billion over ten years. and then you deal with some of these high cost private insurance plans under medicare and a couple of other minor changes that won't hurt average american, won't m
't think any credible economist will tell you we can simply cut our way out of the current deficits and debt. we need new revenues, and where should they come from? should they come from a middle class or working families that have really struggled or had setbacks in the last decade, or should it come from families that have done very well and can be asked to do more? if you look at the prosperity we enjoyed during the clinton administration when the tax rates were higher on upper income families, that certainly didn't kill economic growth. we have incredible economic growth during the clinton years. this same, tired argument that we hear time and time again that any kind of tax increase on anyone will hurt the economy, it isn't borne out by history. >> there are analysts that say both of these proposals are essentially for the base, and na in reality both sides know you'll come to the middle. you have johnny isakson who said earlier there's too much posturing going on here. what is your response that in relation the proposal from the white house and the president as well as from sp
and is gradually repairing itself and healing itself with the assistance of the fiscal deficit. and this is one of the key things that if you pull that away too soon, you'll slow down the repair in the private sector balance sheets. and then you'll go much closer to stall speed so the economy will be much more vulnerable and exposed to shocks from europe, oil, you name it. >> and of course it increases the deficit, makes the troubles more difficult to direct longer term and now they want it do sort of the major reform entitlement next year. is that ever going to happen if the impetus isn't to deal with it right away? >> i think nancy pelosi and others are correct that the real issue, not just democrats, but also various republicans and bowles-simpson and everyone else, the real issue confronting the united states is not tomorrow's fiscal cliff. it's the outyears and the fiscal abyss of these entitlements that are unfunded. clearly unaffordable. so our view of the optimal way to deal with this is to not worry about today's fiscal deficit because that's a consequence of where the economy is. abso
that doubled the tax hikes that he campaigned on and it adds about $150 billion more, not less to the deficit in and new spending. to republicans with that kind of equivalent of lucy and the football and they are laying flat on their backs? >> republicans scoffed at this first foray from the white house. they thought was ridiculous. for the white house it was the first attempt, first specific plan we've seen since the election being put out there. it was frankly a wish list. john boehner acknowledges as much in his comments was that the white house would like to see. if we do get a deal before christmas it won't look anything like this. >> gregg: instead of meeting with members of congress, even day after day and tens of thousands of dollars the president doesn't do that. the president heads back on the campaign trail gives speeches about it. how frustrating is this to some of the folks on capitol hill who do want to sit down and work with him? >> i think it's frustrating to some members of congress, perhaps members of his own party more than anything. if you look at his record he doesn't do
's debt ceiling is clear. >> this is not about getting a handle on deficits or debt for him. it's about spending even more than he has. >> white house aids reject the republican claims that holding the debt limit over the president's head is the only mechanism to get him to trim spending. >> you're just going to keep at the debt limit goes higher, you spend more money. you and congress, both. >> that's false. president signed into law a trillion dollars in discretionary cuts. the president has a specific proposal to achieve $600 billion in savings from entitlement programs like health care entitlement programs. >> jay compared republican pressure on the debt ceiling to a hostage taking. >> a profoundly bad idea that i think could not be more frightening for american businesses, and american workers. >> treasury secretary tim geithner may have frightened people yesterday saying the white house is prepared to go off the fiscal cliff unless republicans bend on taxes. a comment by former democratic potential candidate howard deen frightened republicans that the debate is not just about rais
schools, and i want to do all this while bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. now -- [ applause ] >> on this last point we probably heard a lot of talk in washington and in the media about the deadlines that we're facing on jobs and taxes and investment. this is not some run of the mill debate. this isn't about which political party can come out on top in negotiations. we've got important decisions to make, and they'll have a real impact on businesses and families all across the country. our ultimate goal, our long-term goal is to get our long-term deficit under control in a way that is balanced and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations. i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're iffing to have to raise a little more revenue. we got to cut on the spending we don't need, building on the trillion dollars of spending cuts we've already made, and if we combine those two things, we can create a path where america is paying its bills while still be
balanced approach to reducing the deficit. here is a house republican on higher rates. >> republicans are willing to make sure we don't go over this fiscal cliff but at the same time don't harm this economy. what has to happen here if the president shows a little leadership we are willing to stay in the room and stay here and we are willing to get this done. that's why you saw a proposal that is raoeubl reasonable that meets his criteria. >> reporter: steny hoyer said in the next few days we will see substantive movement in private to get this done. jenna: we'll continue to watch the play-by-play, mike, thank you. jon: right now we are continuing to await a speech by former president george w. bush, the speakers are taking to the podium there to get ready to introduce the former president. he is set to address a conference there in dallas, where he will spotlight the positive impact of immigration on u.s. economic growth. this as the g.o.p. looks to attract more hiss to the party. meantime mr. bush's father, former president george h.w. bush is spending another day in the hospital bei
and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit but so he can spend to his heart's content. as a result some democrats have pushed the president to just raise the nation's debt ceiling on his own. they believe he has that executive power by invoking the 14th amendment of the constitution. but jay jay cancer carney the white house spokesman has studied that. they do not believe the president has that executive power. what that means they have got to go to congress to get the debt ceiling lifted the next couple of mons. that means the showdown is coming, shep. >> shepard: ed henry at the white house lawn. one critical republic who criticized house speaker john boehner over own party fiscal cliff honor says is he resigning. an important man, too. south carolina senator jim demint a key force behind the tea party movement. the founder of the tea party caucus in the senate and who predicted that the healthcare debate would be president obama's water loo. remember that? earlier this week he argued that speaker boehner's proposal tax hikes would destroy jobs. but senator demind sa
of it right, then a lot of the other issues surrounding deficit reduction in a fair and balanced, responsible way are going to be a whole lot easier. >> reporter: white house officials say mr. obama is not interested in personally meeting with congressional republicans because those meetings did little to resolve the 2010 debt ceiling crisis. but when mr. obama later skipped congressional meetings and campaigned to extend the 2% payroll tax cut and maintain lower student loan interest rates, he won. the president is primarily focused on step one of this process-- winning the middle class tax cut debate. step two is being led by his treasury secretary jim geithner and liaison rob nabors. they are going to work with congress on spending cut and other fiscal cliff details. the first meeting will be tomorrow on the hill. >> pelley: major, president said today he thought all this could be done by christmas. why does he think so? >> reporter: because that is the big takeaway, scott, from the president's conversation on saturday with house speaker john boehner. the two agreed it was in foeryone's be
to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks, for example, about $800 billion worth of revenues, but he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: so unbalanced approach is the white house's nice way of saying you got to be kidding me. jay carney used the phrase in the briefing just now that the proposal from the republicans was a bunch of magic needs and fairy dust and the current standoff is continuing with neither side talking today, brooke. >> magic beans, fairy dust, la la land, it is laughable but not. it is serious stuff that affects every one of us come january 1st, 28 days to go. we know some of the reporting from dana bash on the hill, there are no formal talks going on. the president insists in speaking in this bloomberg interview, he does speak to speaker boehner all the time that the meetings are not what matter. what have you, jessica yellin what have you learned in your repo
, pay cut contributions will go from 4.% to 6.2%, that's $115 billion a year that will go to deficit reduction instead of being pumped into the economy. heidi cherholts is an economist. >> it's less money for consumers to spend that means the demand for goods and services will drop. who provides goods and services? workers. so employment will fall. >> reporter: those in favor of allowing the tax cut to expire argue money for social security payments has to come from somewhere. with although mejia says that somewhere will mean doing without some of the basics. >> might be a pair of sneakers. might be that jacket that they want to go to school with in the winter. might be those pair of boots that they want to go and keep warm. >> reporter: for john mejia, the debate in washington is not about the federal budget it's about his family's. jim axelrod, cbs news, west new york, new jersey. >> pelley: well, a lot of families with tight budgets will be happy to hear this next story: the housing market is coming back. we got a report today that says home prices in october had their biggest gai
and there should be the maximum spending cuts possible. i think that is not just true for the affect on the deficit, but because the deficit is being monatized at this point in time through quantitative easing it can result in great h greater inflation down the road. he would have thought this is not a time to raise taxes, this is a time to cut government spending. we don't want to have a larger government deficit and this is the course that would lead to the greatest prosperity in the economy. he would not have agreed that if we go over the fiscal cliff that that would have a negative impact on the economy, he would say rather that by bringing the deficit down, by having the prospect of lower inflation in the future, that will be good for interest rates and that would be good for the economy in the coming years. jenna: what would he say to those american citizens, though, that say, listen, over the fiscal cliff, i'm afraid of that, i don't even want to entertain the possibilities of what that would look like. >> i think when it comes to issues such as the extension of unemployment benefits, social
debt and deficits a lot smaller by comparison because you get more government revenue. you're right, it is absolutely a core principle of republicans we don't want taxes to go up to get more government. if we have tax reform effort that will lower the tax base, get more revenue and fuel economic growth that is something republicans will embrace. there could be revenue generated by closure of loopholes and deductions. we can't accomplish anything by raising tax that is good good for the economy and we're very concerned about the economy. martha: it will be interesting to see what timothy geithner brings to these discussions today. we'll be reporting on it and you will be there on the hill. thank you very much. >> we'll look forward to it. thanks, martha. martha: all right. bill: there is a controversial vote set to take place today at the united nations and the u.s. is expected to vote against it. eric shawn's live at the u.n. eric, good morning to you, what is the vote about first of all and what's expected to happen? >> reporter: good morning, bill. the vote on the palestinians, a
deficit everybody in washington agreed they should come together to make the tough decisions that had to be made. something that would provide short-term stimulus but long-term debt relief. after all we all knew something had to be done. the health of our nation depended on it. washington surprise, surprise, decided to delay for the umpteenth time kicking the proverbial can down the road. then the campaign really heated up and we were told we would have our sweet relief after the election. finally the story went voters would provide clarity, a choice played out across the country that would deliver the elusive answers. what are we getting? endless posturing game playing and the same rhetoric over and over again. both sides standing up and preening themselves campaign style as if they expect the public to pay attention and give deference to the repetition of the same ideas. i for one are tired of it. americans have been poked and prodded, pulled left and right at the same time and used in some cases abused. the campaign is over. we have had our fill of the various white house represent
at home in prince george's county, but also in annapolis. >> crime is down. he closed two budget deficits, and now has hopes for the fbi to follow. he says its focus has been on making the county more business friendly. >> those who especially thought that there was a pay-for-play here, and that they didn't want to do business here, i wanted to have something that would say to them, you know what, maybe we should take a chance on prince george's county. >> the county executive says for the rest of his term, his first priority, education, and improving the prince george's county school system. he says he knows for sure that he's running for a second term. in prince george's county, tracee wilkins, news4. >>> the brother of former d.c. council chairman kwame brown has been charged with bank fraud, the same charge that led kwame brown to resign his council seat earlier this year. according to the charging documents, che brown made false claims about his income on a mortgage loan application back in 2010. his lawyer says brown plans to plead guilty. che brown also pleaded guilty to a similar
the problem? so the fiscal cliff would address the deficit problem. it is $5.5 trillion to the deficit. nobody wants it to happen. you know, the interesting thing about the president's proposal, i disagree with the stimulus spending being included. i support stimulus spending but that is kind of an extraneous issue right now. the cliff is basically the expiration of the tax rates and the across the board spending cuts of about 9% across defense and all domestic spending. that is the fiscal cliff. we shouldn't be dealing with other issues that are long term in order to avert the cliff as it were. that is immediate crisis. we have long term situation --. bill: but you know when lawmakers get a little bit of rope, you know, when they get time to think about it and push it off to the next year, it never gets done. this budget proposal, there are many who wonder whether or not even democrats could support it. the last budget that came from the white house went to the senate, it went 98-0 against it. no one voted for it. melissa: well, that was kind of a tricky parliamentary issue as well but, i do
how to deal with this deficit. it is all there, you know, in black and white. anybody can read that plan. it has entitlement cuts, it has, you know, cuts in various programs and so on. so they have been pretty specific about what they want. by the way, in the senate, there is no budget for three years. >> here's the thing -- >> but let me raise the other point. i think jessica had it not exactly right when she said the republicans haven't been specific about how they would be willing to raise taxes. what republicans are saying is we're willing to put a cap on deductions of $30,000, $40,000, $50,000, haven't been specific about the number, but that's a way to reduincrease the taxes o wealthier taxpayers but in a way that doesn't raise tax rates. that seems to be a big concession. >> i'm talking about negotiations. if the american people wanted paul ryan's plan, they would have voted for paul ryan. they didn't. they voted for compromise. and that's not happening. wouldn't the most direct way, the best way would be a counteroffer of some sort? with specifics? >> well, you know, do
-era rates. which would raise marginal tax rates on the rich from 36% to 39.6%. a real deficit reduction. 70% of the american people support that. they can't even come to terms with that. they seem to have not noticed the republicans that we did have an election. the president campaigned on this question of continuing tax cuts for the middle class but raising them back to the clinton rates -- returning to the clinton rates for the top 2%. he pledged that he would veto anything but that. and he will. so until the republicans agree to those clinton-era rates, we are going to go off the fiscal cliff. >> you know, it's interesting, ari, you'll remember this because you were the white house press secretary in 2001 and 2003 when those bush-era tax rates were approved basically by republicans, very few democrats voted to approve those bush-era tax cuts. so why not do what the republican congressman from oklahoma says, what paul just said, go ahead, declare victory. say, look, all these democrats are now on board, they support for 98% of the american people the bush-era tax rates for a long time to
our deficit. and mr. bowles himself said there is no serious discussion of spending cuts so far. and unless there is, there is a real danger of going off the fiscal cliff. listen, going off the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and will cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to avert the fiscal cliff by passing legislation to stop all the tax hikes. to replace the sequester, and pave way for -- pave the way for tax reform and entitlement reform. and we're the only ones with a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. but without spending cuts and entitlement reforms, it's going to be impossible to address our country's debt crisis. and get our economy going again and to create jobs. so right now, all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it's time for the president, congressional democrats, to tell the american people what spending cuts they're really willing to make. with that i'll take a few questions. >> speaker boehner, why will you not tell
are the points in time when you're able to deal with some of the deficit issues -- and by the way, government is only funded through march, anyway. so regardless of the debt ceiling, there's still the issue of the fact that we have-- we have only funded government through march. there are two points, the funding of government and the debt ceiling and i would agree with you, that it's unfortunate that a 11 reg point like that has to be used. we should sit down to solve the problem. but the it's the only thing thus far that produced results -- we got the budget control act last time-- to really take our nation towards solvency. i would agree with you. i wish we could sit down and self-solve it. i think there is a majority in the hous house and senate that t to do that, but the only two negotiators that matter right now are the president and speaker boehner. and as i mentioned before-- again, i understand there are two sides of this tale-- the president is really not yet offering the kind of reforms that would make these programs solvent for the long haul so we're trying to think how do we get t
to cut government services than raise taxes to reduce the federal deficit. >> if the nation goes over the cliff at the end of the year it is going to affect everyone including the unemployed as abc's jonathan karl reports. >> reporter: melinda vega has been put on notice. if congress and the president don't get their act together, her unemployment checks will stop immediately at the end of the year. >> we're dependent on that money to pay the bills. she has been what a job for a year. her $450 a week unemployment check her life line. >> we won't be able to pay some of our bills and, i mean, you know, that's for christmas and things of that nature, probably off the table. >> reporter: she is not alone. without a deal, unemployment compensation will end for more than 2 million people out of work more than 26 weeks. many of the unemployed started receiving the news this week from prerecorded phone calls like this one in washington state. >> emergency unemployment compensation shuts off end of the december unless congress votes to extend the program. >> reporter: and of course, going off
strategies, haven't we, doug, the ways to tackle the debt and deficit. is there any alternative that really exists besides cutting government waste and spending? >> reporter: one potential avenue they could take would be to actually fall off the fiscal cliff. that would necessarily make the difficult choices that congress and white house seem unwilling to make. tom schatz says that congress has a very typical way they approach these kinds of spending cuts. here he is again. >> with overlap and duplication is the proclivity in washington to create a program to solve a problem. something's wrong. we're not doing it right. we're falling behind in science and math. let's create five new programs. that has been the approach. >> reporter: as we speak treasury secretary tim geithner is meeting behind closed doors with the white house point man on congressional affairs with senate majority leader harry reid. perhaps we'll learn more about what kind of spending cuts the democrats are proposing after that meeting is done. jenna, back to you. jenna: we'll talk a little more about that now, doug. thank
. and that is, we must ask the wealthy to pay a little more so we can get these deficit eliminated. get our debt paid down and start growing the economy again. that's not unusual or new to any of us. nobody in the country. so i think the president is sticking to what he said throughout the campaign and as i said 3 million more people voted for him than voted for the other guy. >> with that said, on taxes, if there's any chance on your side, is there any chance on your side to come down to the form of a smaller tax hike on incomes above $250,000 or would you consider keeping rate it is same at $250,000 and raising them only on higher incomes, say half a million or $1 million a year? >> i think it's all part of the negotiations. we know where the president is and that is 250,000. but there are a lot of democrats who voiced back before the campaign 500,000, some say even a million. all of that is going to be negotiated. the president wants 250. if mr. boehner wants to come and offer something different, i'm sure he will do that. but the president stands at 250. which is below even where i was but h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)